The State of Child Wellbeing in Kansas and Missouri
The State of Child Wellbeing in Kansas and Missouri

Key Findings from the 2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book

The 2017 KIDS COUNT Data book — an annual report focusing on key trends in child well-being — has been released, and we’d like to share some important findings related to the work you make possible.

KIDS COUNT Data Book 2017
Kansas Findings:

  • Fifty-six percent of young children (ages 3 and 4) in Kansas are not in school. This indicator is significant, because research tells us high-quality early education can significantly increase the likelihood of future academic success and reduce future need for social services. By improving the quality and accessibility of early education, we can address many of the issues outlined in the report.
  • Fourth grade reading proficiency remains steady. In 2015, 65 percent of Kansas fourth graders were not proficient readers.
  • When compared to all 50 states, Kansas’ overall education rank continues to fall — from 12 in 2015, to 20 in 2016, to 26 in 2017.
  • There was a slight reduction in the number of children living in poverty. The number fell from 126,000 in 2014 (18 percent) to 122,000 in 2015 (17 percent).
  • Children whose parents lack secure employment fell slightly from 25 percent in 2014 to 23 percent in 2015. In 2008, the rate was 22 percent.

 

Missouri Findings:

  • Fifty-six percent of young children (ages 3 and 4) in Missouri are not in school. This indicator is significant, because research tells us high-quality early education can significantly increase the likelihood of future academic and reduce future need for social services. By improving the quality and accessibility of early education, we can address many of the issues outlined in the report.
  • Fourth grade reading proficiency has remained steady — 64 percent of Missouri fourth graders are not proficient readers.
  • High school students not graduating on time was significantly reduced — falling from 18 percent for the 2007-08 school year to 12 percent for the 2014-15 school year.
  • When compared to all 50 states, Missouri’s overall education rank improved from 26 in 2016 to 21 in 2017.
  • The percentage of children living in poverty continues to decline falling from 22 percent in 2013, to 21 percent in 2014, to 20 percent in 2015 — Missouri has now dipped below the national average or 21 percent.
  • There has been a reduction in parents lacking secure employment — falling from 31 percent in 2010 to 27 percent in 2015. However, nearly 400,000 children are still growing up in stressful homes.

 

Source: Annie E. Casey Foundation’s KIDS COUNT Project

 

Learn more about TFC's work to address these issues in out 2016 Annual Report.

Support our work to improve the quality and accessibility of early education.